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Heroes in fantasy romance novels

May 19, 2012 in Fantasy romance

Source: loveromancepassion.com

Where can I find a dude like the heroes I read about in fantasy romance novels? Do they really exist?

Yes, I do read fantasy romance novels as a form of escape. Yet I can’t help but compare Jamal to the guys in these novels. Are they just examples just too difficult for a real person to live up to? Even a Coal?

One of my favorite things to do is read urban fantasy books with a love story intertwined. I get to escape into an imaginary setting and witness the characters overcome all sorts of obstacles to find or win the love of their life. The male is always this amazing specimen, who conquers mountains and tumultuous terrain to save the one he loves from a premature demise.

If the writers behind these fantasy romance novels are “writing what they know,” then there had to be real people in their lives who inspired these characters—which means that, at some point in time, there really was some amazing man who came to their rescue or proved to be worth risking everything for.

Even in post apocalyptic books, when there seems like there’s no hope whatsoever, some modern day knight-in-shining-armor comes through, changing the plot forever. Even when the character starts out being a jerk, he undergoes a metamorphosis like no other, and becomes the hero women used to dream of in the Old World.

Where does that leave those of us stuck in reality, where mating is a requirement for survival? Can anyone truly be themselves with the kind of pressure we experience on a daily basis? With the tick-tick-tock of the clock counting down the days to our deadline to mate, how can anyone just relax and let a relationship take its natural course? While it seems easy to be swept off your feet in all the urban fantasy books I read, it just isn’t in the New World.

So while I love to feel a glimmer of hope when the heroine in one of my post apocalyptic books finds the love of her life and escapes her demise, it’s hard to apply it to my own life. It’s like the cherry on a hot fudge sundae, a little extra bit of pure ecstasy awarded after a treacherous struggle for survival. But the sundae will melt, and where does that leave the cherry?

As much as I love to dream, I feel like these heroes are fictional ghosts from the Old World, with little to no place in the one we live in now—except for in fantasy romance novels.

Nostradamus— Urban fantasy at its best

March 28, 2012 in Urban Fantasy

Perhaps it’s the current preoccupation with young adult books, maybe it’s the end of the Mayan calendar hoopla, or we can chalk it up to all the hype surrounding planetary alignments, magnetic pole shifts and birds dropping out of the sky. No matter the cause, people can’t seem to ignore the rumors and misconceptions about 2012. Meanwhile, Pearls keep disappearing and it’s hard to keep people focused on the real question at hand—how to save the pearls.

Proponents of urban fantasy would have us believe that it all stems from the predictions of Nostradamus.  Best known for his book Les Propheties (“The Prophecies”), written in 1555, Nostradamus was a French apothecary and reputed seer who moved out of medicine and into the occult after a trip to Italy. He wrote his first annual almanac in 1550 and gained notoriety amongst the rich and noble, who flocked to him for horoscopes and psychic advice. Unlike true astrologers, Nostradamus had clients supply him with their birth charts—it’s recorded that when he tried to calculate them himself, there were many errors. Sounds like these almanacs were more like their own brand of fantasy and adventure stories of that time.

Les Propheties was Nostradamus’ written project consisting of one thousand mainly French quatrains—these make up the mostly undated prophecies that made him famous. Undated prophecies sound like quite an anomaly to me, which is why I chalk them up to nothing more than urban fantasy and fiction. The publication of this book attracted a following that credits him with predicting many major world events—again, if they’re without dates, it would be like one of us predicting an earthquake in California. We know it may happen, but exactly when is difficult for us to divine. Les Propheties received a mixed reaction when it was published—some people thought Nostradamus was insane, a phony or a servant of evil, while many of the prominent and elite thought the book contained spiritually inspired prophecies.

Feeling threatened by religious fanatics, Nostradamus created a method of hiding his meaning through the use of “Virgilianized” syntax, word games and a mixture of other languages including Latin, Italian, Greek and Provençal. Since the quatrains were written in Middle French, this led to many problems in the translations, resulting in vagueries, metaphors and allusion. Some are so vague that you can conclude they make absolutely no sense, or that they provide justification for any event. Many academic sources maintain that the associations made between world events and his predictions are the result of these mistranslations or misinterpretations.

An example of a glaring inaccuracy is Nostradamus famously predicted prosperity for King Henry II of France just two years before his death in a jousting accident. He might as well have written a fantasy and adventure novel depicting a long life for the king.

Those who believe in the prophecy of 2012 usually fail to identify the quatrain where this prediction is made. In fact, his followers tend to look for matches to events in his quatrains after the events occur. They may as well focus on fantasy and adventure novels, as Nostradamus never directly mentions December 21, 2012.

If after researching Nostradamus, you still want to believe the hype about his prediction of an apocalyptic event in 2012, then you’ll need to ignore the fact that his quatrains extend well beyond 2012—as in all the way to 3790. Clearly, if all of those predictions are correct, then the world cannot possibly end this year.

My suggestion? Go back to reading young adult books in your free time and focus your attention on ways to save the pearls.

Source: Mayanpredictions.net

 

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Urban fantasy and balancing acts

March 22, 2012 in Urban Fantasy

Today and the days surrounding are supposedly very powerful—in fact, the perfect time to bring every urban fantasy to life.  They say the days around the spring equinox are the best time to make a list of your goals and focus on making them come true—if that’s the case, then you know I’m focusing on how to save the Pearls and locking down my fantasy romance already!

Planetary Numerologist, John Davis, also the Director of Coptic Fellowship International and President of Spiritual Unity of Nations, wrote that March 21, 2012 is the most important date he has ever analyzed. As it’s exactly nine months before this year’s winter solstice on December 21, whatever seed we plant on and around March 21 will supposedly come true by December 21. That would work out perfectly for me, since we all know that my 18th birthday is right before that. So if I can cement my fantasy romance and mate with Jamal, I will survive my fate.

While some of us are focusing on creating the kind of world we want to live in, one where Pearls, Coals, Ambers and Tiger’s Eyes all live in peace and harmony, without any class system, others are focused on a different kind of young adult fantasy: balancing eggs. Yes, you read that right. Instead of thinking about peace, respect, love and a planet that is full of resources, the egg balancers are springing out of the woodwork. Apparently, it has something to do with the fact that this is one of the only two days each year where the day and night are exactly the same length.

Tales of urban fantasy state that, during the equinox, the position of the sun and other planets during the equinoxes enable miraculous feats of balance to occur. Hmmm. People are literally spending their time propping up eggs and cleaning up the mess when they don’t stand up on their own. They do this every year, despite the fact that astronomers report that equinoxes have no physical effect on objects or balance. Funnily enough, while the egg balancers come out during this time of year, at the fall equinox, these same people try to balance brooms—I’m gonna guess in honor of witches and Halloween.

I’ve read about the broom standers in a few young adult fantasy books—of course, the premise had to do with wizardry and the occult. I’m not going to lie, I tried it when I was little. The brooms just fell each time, knocking me on the forehead once or twice. I chalked it up to the fact that I was a lowly Pearl with no witchy or supernatural powers, and that the broom standers had to be getting a little help from above—or below. I guess I let all the tales of urban fantasy I’d read spark my imagination into believing. At least I didn’t try the messy egg trick!

I’m older now and not quite so gullible. Not to knock anyone’s else’s choices, but since I’m trying to help save the Pearls and my own life, I’m choosing to make a little list and check it more than twice. Plus, I don’t really want to spend my night cleaning up egg yolks.

Source: .indianasnewscenter.com

 

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by eden

Full moon—romantic apocalypse or fodder for adventure romance novels?

March 8, 2012 in Adventure romance tips

The full moon in Virgo is here. While our oh-so-lovely Ethics Officer blogged about whether or not a full moon is a sign of an apocalypse world, I was inspired to blog about the full moon’s so-called effects on love. I’ve read about in everything from adventure romance novels and astrology texts to science fiction and young adult books, but I still don’t know what exactly to believe.

Clearly, the full moon is often used to inspire paranormal and supernatural elements in many young adult books. Think of all the character who turn from humans into werewolves at the sight of a full moon or the psychic phenomena attributed to its presence. It’s also very prevalent in my favorite genre— fantasy romance novels. Characters often have their first kiss in the light of the full moon or realize that they’ve found the one due to the clarity it brings them.

The moon is illuminated partly by direct sunlight, and when it’s “full,” we get to see it in its brightest, fullest state. In a series of amazing adventure romance novels that I recently finished, the protagonist always sees more clearly when there is a full moon. It’s like the truth is illuminated when the moon is full. She achieves the clarity to really hear her inner compass and make decisions about the issues in her life.

In one of my favorite fantasy romance novels, the truth is revealed to the main character when the moon is full. She experiences her first real breakup when the full moon helps reveal her boyfriend’s true character. Luckily, or through serendipity, she also meets the next love of her life during a full moon cycle.

Other young adult books with more of a paranormal romance angle talk about casting spells or invoking spirits during the full moon. It’s thought that magic is most powerful on the night of the full moon, and that spells dealing with otherworldly energies are strongest during this phase. In fact, several occult traditions believe the only time to cast love spells is during the full moon.

Whatever the reality is, all I know is I hope this full moon brings my true love to fruition. I only have a few months left to mate and my relationship with my favorite Coal is kind of a roller coaster. Maybe I’ll cast that love spell… or find my own clarity in its light. I just know I can count on something happening when it’s here.

Source: Freewiccaschool.com

Full moons—sign of the apocalypse world?

March 8, 2012 in Apocalypse World

Many people believe that every full moon is a sign of an apocalypse world—especially a blue moon. Even more believe that when the moon is full, emergency rooms and jails are packed, if not overflowing. These same people blame everything from increases in crime and psychotic behavior to stock market fluctuations and traffic accidents on the “lunar effect” of a full moon. If you ask me, they’ve read one too many romance fantasy novels.

History books reveal that in 19th-century England, lawyers often used the “not guilty by reason of the full moon” defense to get their clients off the hook—and it worked. Psychiatrist Arnold Lieber wrote a best seller, How the Moon Affects You, where he posited that since the human body is 65 percent water, the moon has the same effect on it that it has on the pull on the ocean’s tides. In actuality, he may have read too many romance fantasy novels himself.

While it’s easy to fall into the mindset that the full moon could bring the onset of an apocalypse world, especially with all the Mayan calendar hype, I would bet my life that it’s impossible.

Many studies have been conducted over the years, attempting to show that there really is such a thing as a “lunar effect.” A study of homicides in Dade County, Florida claimed that there was an upsurge in killings in the 24 hours before and after the full moon. However, other researchers in the same county claimed this to be pure urban fantasy due to the dubious statistical methods the other researchers has used. When the study was reevaluated, the findings were shown to be incorrect.

Another study claimed that more traffic accidents occurred during a full moon. More urban fantasy—the study was conducted on a weekend, when traffic accident statistics are higher in general. In 1985, two famous scientists, Rotton and Kelly, did what “meta-analysis” of 37 studies of the “lunar effect.” Their research culminated in this fact: the moon accounted for less than 3/100 of 1 percent of the monthly variation.

Just like all the other rumors of the impending apocalypse world, these claims of a lunar effect fall apart when looked at closely. You don’t need to be a historian to realize this—you just need to be able to look at the facts. The reasoning about the moon having the same pull on our bodies as it does the ocean’s tide doesn’t make sense. Tides don’t occur just once or twice a month like a full moon does—they happen once or twice a day. At full and new moons, the sun, earth and moon are lined up, resulting in higher tides. Plus, the change in tides rarely is greater than 10 feet.

Keep reading your science fiction and fantasy books, but don’t let them get you in a tizzy. Chances are you have absolutely nothing to worry about, except for a nightmare or two.

Source: wayseers.eu

Are the rumors true—or is it just science fiction and fantasy?

March 2, 2012 in Urban Fantasy

We all know it’s the year 2012 and if you’re a science fiction and fantasy aficionado, you’ve heard all the theories about the end of the world. Predictions of swine flu and H1N1 outbreaks, terrorist attacks, wars in the Middle East, global warming and The Great Meltdown are rampant. Yet are they backed by any bit of truth whatsoever or are they simply fodder for the next best urban fantasy novels?

December 21, 2012 is the actual end of the 5,126-year Mayan calendar, aka a sign of the apocalypse. If I were a science fiction and fantasy writer, I’d be basing my next novel around that. I can see the marketing campaign now 12/21/12—the end of a beautiful mess. The numbers are perfect and the possibilities endless.

Hundreds of thousands of young adults (and some not-so-young) are lining up to see the latest dark urban fantasy and dystopian novels turned into films. There seems to be a fascination, albeit a little sick, with watching the future-as-a-nightmare come to fruition. Young adult books with dystopian titles are being released by the masses, with fans letting their imaginations run amok with scenarios of everything from viruses and flesh eating zombies to totalitarian leaders and an absolute scarcity of food and other resources.

As we wonder what the future holds, could we actually be manifesting these pipe dreams into reality? If books like The Secret and other pop culture phenomena touting the power of our thought and the Law of Attraction are accurate, and readers continue flocking to read and set their attention on the latest young adult books with post apocalyptic scenarios, we could theoretically set these disastrous circumstances into motion, couldn’t we? As people everywhere, Pearls and Coals alike, stockpile food and weaponry, prepare for zombie altercations and obtain vaccinations for the most obscure diseases, aren’t they actually setting their intention on creating these exact circumstances?

Regardless of what 2012 brings us, the obsession seems to have only begun. As we continue to work to save the Pearls, the rest of our population seems focused on all these imaginary, mythical threats. Perhaps focusing on a world of fantasy is the only way some can deal with impending doom. Either way, we’ll keep trying to help as many Pearls as possible survive their real life threats and face their ultimate destiny.

Source: Open.Salon.com

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What is a romantic apocalypse?

January 14, 2012 in Eden's Posts

Everyone keeps asking what exactly a romantic apocalypse is, so I figured I should try to explain it for the sSave the Pearls community. I receive messages from so many people trying to guess what it is—some of the funniest include “The world ends because all of the fantasy and adventure is wiped from the face of the planet,” or “When civilization ends abruptly due to the lack of romance throughout,” and my absolutely favorite, “When a jilted lover uses his suffering to fuel a Columbine-style attack on all the major hot spots of the world.” I think these people are reading too many young adult books, because those theories couldn’t be any less realistic.

A romantic apocalypse actually defines the movement that the Coals have secretly launched against us. It’s their quest to eradicate all that is left of the Pearls, extinguishing any chance of our survival or return to happier socioeconomic times. It’s their pledge that if all Pearls don’t find a mate, they will be eliminated from society. It’s obviously an underground movement, just like the Save the Pearls campaign is a stealth community.

In most young adult books, there are the villains who threaten the main characters. In some stories, they are obviously evil and often decked with supernatural powers, while in others they are simply the bane of the protagonist’s existence—whether they stand in the way of a fantasy romance or provide some other obstacle to achieving their dreams. In our world, they are the Coals and the FFP, both trying to use their power in ways that defy humanity and decency.

While that may not be an answer that will satisfy fans of fantasy and adventure, it’s the one that counts. We have to be realistic and fully comprehend what we’re dealing with here. Pearls continue to disappear every day, never to be found—all in that same age range: 18 for females and 24 for males. Some are reported, while others are not. Each being that goes missing either refused to find a mate or just had zero luck in the fantasy romance department. Once they reach their “deadline,” it’s only a matter of time before they come. No one has ever escaped to tell the story of exactly who “they” are and what actually happens, but we know it’s no bueno.

Whether a romantic apocalypse is a bloody massacre or a stealth attack that the victim doesn’t see coming, it’s not good and definitely not fun. I wish all other Pearls good luck in mating so they can avoid this dark cloud that infinitely hangs over our heads. In the meantime, I’ll continue to try my hardest to make our cause the thing that stops this horrible movement.

Source: layoutsparks.com

Strategies for an Apocalypse World

December 29, 2011 in Apocalypse World

All the media headlines about terrorism, global warming and conflicts in the Middle East, coupled with the publicity surrounding the end of the Mayan calendar, seem to point to the imminence of an apocalypse world. While some of our focus at the Save the Pearls headquarters is to diffuse the hype, we also want the population to be prepared for anything. For all we know, a romantic apocalypse could indicate the beginning of the end.

A friendly Coal I know who is an expert in apocalypse world safety was nice enough to share some helpful strategies with us. Put these into effect immediately!

1) Get in prime physical shape. This is an obvious advantage for finding an adventure romance, but it’s going to be a prerequisite for survival. You’re going to need to be able to stay up for hours on end, travel by foot, run lengthy distances and possibly fight off otherworldly creatures.

2) Find a mate quick. Not only is this critical for Pearls, but it will improve your chances of survival. While it’s always fun to be involved in adventure romance, this will be a whole other level of getting to know one another, so it’s best to already have your relationship established. If you’re currently single, create online profiles on the save the pearls site and get out there and meet others who are trying to find a mate. Make yourself as attractive as possible, go on dates as much as possible, and read books and blog posts on how to have a successful relationship.

3) Get acquainted with weaponry. Stockpile as many guns, knives, hatchets and machetes as possible—and learn how to use them like a pro. Take safety classes as well as combat classes so that you can master the arts and give yourself the best chances possible of surviving in an apocalypse world. You may even want to take up some bad a&$ form of martial arts such as Jiu Jitsu, Karate or Judo to improve your physical health and improve your chances in the case of hand to hand combat.

Source: monstersandcritics.com

Addiction to Science Fiction and Fantasy Books

December 21, 2011 in Apocalypse World

Lately I’ve noticed that all people can talk about are the latest science fiction and fantasy books and films—conventions overflow with people dressed up in costumes that pay homage to their favorite stars, fans are lined up outside ready to wait as long as it takes to get tickets to the latest films and books, and these genres of books have topped the bestseller list for what seems like ages. Why are people so obsessed with this arena when they really should be focused on ensuring their survival in an apocalypse world?

Obviously, science fiction and fantasy books provides an escape from our harsh reality. One of the basic premises of both, with any kind of art for these genres, is irrationality. For example, young adult fantasy books tend to be set in places that transcend the boundaries of the world as we know it. Readers establish relationships with the characters that take precedence over the ones in their real life. They relate and devour sequel after sequel until the character arc is complete.

Readers and moviegoers often read fiction to live vicariously through others, with the goal of entertainment and escape. Even in apocalypse world novels and dystopian books, the settings can still serve as a source of hope, a mission statement for our own belief that we will escape The Heat or whatever else the Uni-Gov has in store for us.

Or perhaps this obsession with the genre, whether experienced through young adult fantasy novels, films or video games, is due to the lack of rational individuals in our society. The Keirsey Temperament website states, “Rationals are very scarce, comprising as little as five to seven percent of the population.” Scary prospect—if that is true, we may find ourselves living out the plots of our favorite apocalypse world novels if there are no rational individuals left to save us from ourselves.

Source: thenextweb.com

 

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by eden

Second Mayan Inscription Points to Apocalypse World in 2012

December 1, 2011 in Apocalypse World

It’s a good thing we’re working to save the Pearls, because there’s a rather large camp that believes that Mayan predictions are true—that the world will end and this big fantasy romance we call life will be over in a flash.

Just a few days ago, Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History released details about Mayan ruins depicting a second reference to the existence of an apocalypse world in 2012.  They released a statement revealing that a brick at the Comalcalco ruin in the southern part of Mexico shows the date of the apocalypse on the ruin’s carved face. While many find this idea to be right up there with science fiction and fantasy stories, others are taking these findings quite seriously, preparing and setting themselves up in case the world does indeed end.

The first finding pointing to the apocalypse world was discovered in Mayan glyphs, on a stone tablet from the Tortuguero site in Tabasco. It’s estimated that both inscriptions were carved approximately 1,300 years ago.

The institute is conducting a meeting with Mayan experts next week to further examine the newest finding and its meaning. In the meantime, what will you do? Stock up on Twinkies, water and fantasy romance books and try to ride this thing out? Will you try to find ways to avoid this romantic apocalypse or just give up on life and live each day like it’s your last?

I know what I’ll be doing—continuing work on the Save the Pearls campaign, reading some adventure romance books and working to help all single Pearls find a mate.

Source: Astrobioloblog.wordpress.com

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